Childhood Wonder and Terror – A Review of “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman

As a child, the world can be filled with wonders and terrors in equal measure. When an adult recalls their childhood there’s a haze over the recollections, a thick mist where only specific memories can be discerned but not with perfect clarity. The memory of a man as a boy serves as a starting point … Continue reading Childhood Wonder and Terror – A Review of “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman

His name is Kane – A Review of Karl Edward Wagner’s “Darkness Weaves”

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KAEXVQG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thekingssquar-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B00KAEXVQG&linkId=9d04ad3f7809e573f072aa9db9a42b84      As I read Karl Edward Wagner’s Darkness Weaves, I was struck by the familiarity of the setting. The pre-industrial (or possibly post-apocalyptic) world of Kane, the Mystic Swordsman, is classic sword and sorcery with malevolent witches, blood-soaked battles, and a plethora of anti-heroes. This is not “high fantasy” of the Tolkien or Brooks … Continue reading His name is Kane – A Review of Karl Edward Wagner’s “Darkness Weaves”

The Gods Among Us – Review of Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods”

Cover Art for "American Gods" You can conjure anything based on belief, especially gods and monsters. The central conceit of American Gods by Neil Gaiman is that because humans believe in the gods, the gods exist. Fairies, kobolds, immortal queens and kings, and so forth are real simply because humans sought explanations for their world. … Continue reading The Gods Among Us – Review of Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods”