In the Aftermath – Review of “Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse”

Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse book cover. Available on Amazon Anthology books can often be a tough read because the tone can shift sharply from one author to the next. The editor of an anthology shares in my mind the majority of the responsibility for the success or failure of the collection. Add to this … Continue reading In the Aftermath – Review of “Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse”

Giving Up the Ghost – Review of Jim Butcher’s “Ghost Story”

Source. When you’ve taken the titanic leap of killing your main character off at the end of your previous novel, what more can you do? If you’re Jim Butcher, you have the wizard detective try to solve his own death as a ghost. Perhaps the strangest of the novels in The Dresden Files series, Ghost … Continue reading Giving Up the Ghost – Review of Jim Butcher’s “Ghost Story”

Beauty Through Pain – Review of A.M. Aylward’s “Displaced Egos”

When personal pain can be transformed into beautiful work, that is my definition of “art”. The collection of poems found in “Displaced Egos” by A.M. Aylward carries the writer’s pain simultaneously like a thick overcoat but underneath that coat is poignancy, grace and reclaimed power. Poetry, as an artform, is deeply personal and in many … Continue reading Beauty Through Pain – Review of A.M. Aylward’s “Displaced Egos”

Love, Sex, and Metal – Review of Meg LaTorre’s “The Cyborg Tinkerer”

Book Cover for "The Cyborg Tinkerer" The most interesting thing I can say about Meg LaTorre’s debut novel “The Cyborg Tinkerer” is that it was an unexpected pleasure to read. This isn’t a criticism of LaTorre’s marketing of the book, which was ubiquitous on her Youtube Channel IWriterly or her blog, which can be found … Continue reading Love, Sex, and Metal – Review of Meg LaTorre’s “The Cyborg Tinkerer”

Reality Bends – A Review of Philip K. Dick’s “A Scanner Darkly”

First Edition Cover for "A Scanner Darkly". Source      When one reads any story written by Philip K. Dick, one expects certain themes and situations to appear. An example would be the question: What constitutes reality? In A Scanner Darkly, Dick uses drug culture and the often-debilitating effects of drug abuse to take the reader … Continue reading Reality Bends – A Review of Philip K. Dick’s “A Scanner Darkly”

Joy in the Darkness – A Review of Steve Martin’s “Born Standing Up”

Cover for "Born Standing Up". Source “If light is thrown on the audience, they don’t laugh…”Steve Martin, "Born Standing Up" Reading a book is a solitary exercise. Sometimes we don’t want others to know what we’re reading or the reasons we’re reading something. Writing is also a solitary exercise for the inverse of those reasons. … Continue reading Joy in the Darkness – A Review of Steve Martin’s “Born Standing Up”

The Winter of Faith – A Review of Bob Seidensticker’s “A Modern Christmas Carol”

I ran across an article on one of my favorite blogs that highlighted this book. A Modern Christmas Carol by Bob Seidensticker is a retelling of Dicken’s classic with an atheist twist to the story. It’s an independent novella and I’m all for stepping outside of the major publishers’ circles. As an added bonus, it’s … Continue reading The Winter of Faith – A Review of Bob Seidensticker’s “A Modern Christmas Carol”

I Don’t Believe in Faeries – A Review of Jim Butcher’s “Summer Knight”

Book Cover for Summer Knight The natural world is a microcosm of forces in constant struggle against each other. The magic (if I may use a rather loaded word) of passing seasons, of vibrant summer giving way to harsh winter, is a storytelling idea that has been constant throughout literature. In certain cultures, particularly the … Continue reading I Don’t Believe in Faeries – A Review of Jim Butcher’s “Summer Knight”

The Dead Never Rest – A Review of Jim Butcher’s “Grave Peril”

Cover Art for Jim Butcher's "Grave Peril" How dangerous are the dead? In our world, the only dangers the dead present are disease and a cause for more violence. In Harry Dresden’s world, the dead in all their various manifestations are unfathomably dangerous. Jim Butcher’s third entry in the Dresden Files, “Grave Peril”, is a … Continue reading The Dead Never Rest – A Review of Jim Butcher’s “Grave Peril”

The Wolves Among Us – Review of Jim Butcher’s “Fool Moon”

Book Cover for "Fool Moon" Anytime an author in any type of fantasy genre invokes the Moon in their title, something furry is making an appearance. Werewolves, much like vampires, are old-school monsters that have never really fallen out of fashion. The popularity of such creatures waxes and wanes but they never truly fade away. … Continue reading The Wolves Among Us – Review of Jim Butcher’s “Fool Moon”