Murder and Telepathy – A review of “The Demolished Man” by Alfred Bester

Cover Art for "The Demolished Man" by Alfred Bester Speculative fiction works in no small part because of its basis in Socratic questioning. It is a simple exercise: Suppose “________”. Alfred Bester’s The Demolished Man, first published in 1953 has both an interesting pedigree (this is the book that won the very first Hugo Award … Continue reading Murder and Telepathy – A review of “The Demolished Man” by Alfred Bester

Going on an Adventure – A Review of “The Monster of Marnmouth Valley” by Charlie J. Greene

https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/519nIKgE75L.jpg Cover art for "The Monster of Marnmouth Valley" I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve not read much children’s fiction as an adult. Growing up, I read voraciously on whatever I could get my hands on (and that my mother would allow me to read). “The Monster of Marnmouth Valley” is a book … Continue reading Going on an Adventure – A Review of “The Monster of Marnmouth Valley” by Charlie J. Greene

Nightmares in the Deep South – A Review of “Seed” by Ania Ahlborn

Cover art for "Seed" by Ania Ahlborn Southern Gothic stories are tricky to pull off. On the one hand, they can be atmospheric in mood and tone. On the other hand, these stories can be the scene of high camp. An example of the latter would be the admittedly tongue-in-cheek Sookie Stackhouse mystery novels. A … Continue reading Nightmares in the Deep South – A Review of “Seed” by Ania Ahlborn

Accepting Your Fate – A Review of “Rerun” by Chris Manteria

If you could see into the future or the past, what would you do with that information? What kind of burden would the visions impose on your life? Would you accept the fate you’ve seen or would you seek to change it? These are some of the questions raised by the premise of Rerun by … Continue reading Accepting Your Fate – A Review of “Rerun” by Chris Manteria

The Madness Spreads – Layden Robinson’s “The Havoc Tree”

https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/51OFX0SEKmL._SX260_.jpg Madness in literature is as old as the art form itself. From the works of Jorge Luis Borges to Hunter S. Thompson to Clive Barker and Stephen King, the mind of a character fracturing into pieces is a compelling topic for a story. It also makes telling the story that much more difficult. Layden … Continue reading The Madness Spreads – Layden Robinson’s “The Havoc Tree”